Placido Domingo


http://www.placidodomingo.com
“The greatest operatic artist of modern times.” – The Guardian

Plácido Domingo has appeared in 130 different roles, more than any other tenor in the annals of music, in a repertoire spanning the centuries from Mozart to Verdi, Berlioz to Puccini and Wagner to Ginastera. He has sung at every important opera house in the world and made well over 100 acclaimed recordings, most of which are full-length operas, often recording the same role more than once. He has been seen in more than 50 opera videos and three feature opera films, and his telecast performance in Puccini’s Tosca, filmed at authentic Roman locations, was seen by more than a billion people in 117 countries.

Domingo has now opened the Met season 21 times, far surpassing the old record set by Caruso. As a conductor he has led opera performances in all the important houses, from the Met to Covent Garden, from the Vienna State Opera to Los Angeles’s Music Center. He has also conducted symphonic concerts with such renowned ensembles as the Berliner and Wiener Philharmoniker, London and Chicago Symphony orchestras, and made numerous recordings as a conductor. Domingo was music director of the Seville World’s Fair in 1992 and one of the founders of the Los Angeles Music Center Opera in 1984, remaining its music adviser and principal guest conductor until July 2000, when he became artistic director. In addition, he has been artistic director of Washington Opera since the 1996/97 season.

Plácido Domingo was born in 1941 in Madrid to parents who were zarzuela (Spanish ope¬retta) performers and moved to Mexico when he was eight. After studying voice, piano and conducting at the Mexico City Conservatory he made his operatic debut at Monterrey as Alfredo in Verdi’s La Traviata and then spent two and a half years with the Israel National Opera, singing 280 performances of twelve different roles. In 1966 he created the title role of Ginastera’s Don Rodrigo in the American premiere at New York City Opera. His Metro¬politan Opera debut came in 1968, as Maurizio in Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur, and he has subsequently appeared there in more than 600 performances and is now in his 40th consecutive season with the company (2008/09). Domingo also ap¬pears regularly at La Scala, the Vienna State Opera, Covent Garden, Opéra Paris-Bastille, San Francisco Opera, Chicago’s Lyric Opera, Washington Opera, Los Angeles Opera, the Liceu in Barcelona, Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Teatro Real in Madrid, and at the Bayreuth and Salzburg Festivals.

Domingo’s repertoire not only includes virtually all the important French and Italian operas but also German roles such as Parsifal, Lohengrin and Tannhäuser, Siegmund in Die Walküre, Walther in Die Meistersinger, Erik in Der fliegende Holländer, The Emperor in Strauss’s Die Frau ohne Schatten, Hüon in Weber’s Oberon and Florestan in Beethoven’s Fidelio. He has created the leading roles in Ginastera’s Don Rodrigo, Menotti’s Goya and Antón Garcia Abril’s Divinas Palabras, and during his 30th anniversary season at the Met he added Herman in Tchaikovsky’s Queen of Spades to his repertoire, his 113th role and his first in Russian. In the 2004/05 season he added role 121, singing Alfano’s Cyrano de Bergerac for the first time at the Metropolitan, and role 122, recording the complete Tristan und Isolde. Highlights of his 2005/06 season included celebrating the 50th anniversary season of the Washington National Opera by conduct¬ing Verdi’s I vespri siciliani and singing five gala evenings. In June 2006 Plácido Domingo appeared at Munich’s Olympic stadium which was host to a spectacular open-air concert, when performers from the worlds of classical and pop gathered to rally fans for the FIFA World Cup Championship. In 2006/07 he sang the Emperor in the world-premiere performance of Tan Dun’s The First Emperor at the Met, repeating it in the 2007/08 season during which he also added to his repertoire the role of Oreste in Gluck’s Iphigénie en Tauride and conducted Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette at the New York house. In that season he also conducted Don Giovanni in Washington, La Bohème and Tosca in Los Angeles, and the world premiere of Howard Shore’s opera The Fly at the Théâtre du Chatelet in Paris, which he brought to Los Angeles Opera in 2008.

Plácido Domingo was the first classical artist to give a solo concert in New York’s Central Park, and his collaboration with his colleagues Luciano Pavarotti and José Carreras, “The Three Tenors”, has been heard in concert all over the globe. His interest in help¬ing young singers led him in 1993 to establish the annual competition “Operalia”. Domingo has raised millions of dollars through benefit concerts on behalf of the victims of the 1985 Mexican earthquake, AIDS and such other disasters as the Armenian earthquake and the mudslides of Acapulco. His countless awards and distinctions include the US Medal of Freedom, an honorary Knighthood of the British Empire, Commander of France’s Légion d’Honneur, recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors, an honorary doctorate from Oxford University, and former Russian President Gorbachev’s World Award for Humanitarian Causes.

Plácido Domingo has recorded with Deutsche Grammophon for 30 years. His discogra¬phy includes not only the most important operas of Bizet, Donizetti, Gounod, Massenet, Mascagni, Mozart, Offenbach, Puccini, Saint-Saëns, Verdi and Wagner, but also French and Italian arias, lieder and tangos. In 2009, Deutsche Grammophon releases Domingo’s Amore infinito, an album of songs and duets based on poems by Pope John Paul II, in which the tenor is joined by Andrea Bocelli, Josh Groban, Katherine Jenkins, Vanessa Williams and his son, Plácido Domingo Jr.
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